Ramesh Balsekar – 1917 – 2009

On Sept 27th, Ramesh Balsekar died in Mumbia, India. Ramesh is best known to many as a translator for Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, between 1979 and 1981. He shared his concepts in his own meetings after Nisargadatta’s passing.
Many found their way to see him in his top floor apartment in the family building in a ‘better part’ of Mumbai.
He had been a banker for most of his life. He was a student at the London School of Economics as a young man and he spoke English well. I visited Ramesh around the end of last century and I found him to be patient and loving to the many vistors that attended his meetings. The room was full, over flowing. A high proportion of Germans were there and people from all parts of the globe. Even though my encounter with Ramesh was fruitful, I was not moved to make him my guru. Meeting him paved the way to meeting Bob Adamson, who does not accept devotees. Bob merely points and brushes off all atempts ‘to make him your guru’.
Ramesh was Indian and the Indian tradition was fitting well enough.
Ramesh will be missed by many.  The habit of turning dead gurus into a god is so missing the point, it seems unnecessary to mention it – but that is what seekers do, not realizing the trap – but that is the nature of a seeker – if they could only see the traps, they would not be seeking at all.
There is a saying that a true guru leaves one greater than himself to carry on the ‘work’.
As I see it, there is no evidence showing up of such a case and one could say that Ramesh strayed considerably from the teachings of Nisargadatta. It does not matter. Whatever turns the seeker around is VALID.
As Ramesh so often said “You are not the doer”.
Everything is an expression of THAT. Tat Twam Asi

On Sept 27th, Ramesh Balsekar died in Mumbia, India. Ramesh is best known to many as a translator for Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, between 1979 and 1981. He shared his concepts in his own meetings after Nisargadatta’s passing.Many found their way to see him in his top floor apartment in the family building in a ‘better part’ of Mumbai.He had been a banker for most of his life. He was a student at the London School of Economics as a young man and he spoke English well. I visited Ramesh around the end of last century and I found him to be patient and loving to the many vistors that attended his meetings. The room was full, over flowing. A high proportion of Germans were there and people from all parts of the globe. Even though my encounter with Ramesh was fruitful, I was not moved to make him my guru. Meeting him paved the way to meeting Bob Adamson, who does not accept devotees. Bob merely points and brushes off all atempts ‘to make him your guru’.Ramesh was Indian and the Indian tradition was fitting well enough.Ramesh will be missed by many.  The habit of turning dead gurus into a god is so missing the point, it seems unnecessary to mention it – but that is what seekers do, not realizing the trap – but that is the nature of a seeker – if they could only see the traps, they would not be seeking at all.There is a saying that a true guru leaves one greater than himself to carry on the ‘work’.As I see it, there is no evidence showing up of such a case and one could say that Ramesh strayed considerably from the teachings of Nisargadatta. It does not matter. Whatever turns the seeker around is VALID.As Ramesh so often said “You are not the doer”.Everything is an expression of THAT. Tat Twam Asi